The one with the racists…

There are some things in life that you think are just ‘wrong’, right?. We’ve all got that list in our heads in some form or other. I’m not talking sin or illegal. I’m talking cultural habits that people around us love, but we hate with a passion. You know the kind of thing I mean: watching Strictly, barn dances, socks and sandals, dance music, eating hummus, supporting Leeds United (ok, that last one should be illegal!)… It tends to be summat and nowt, harmless, a bit of banter that brings colour to life. But what about when we start to do the same with people? You see, that can get a bit more tasty.

Wrong, wrong, wrong! Just wrong…

Because, as I stated to explore last time, Jesus was well known in first century Judea as a wrong ‘un: a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners. If ever anybody fell in with the wrong crowd…

I mean, tax collectors were bad, right? They screwed their own people over for a slice of the Revenue’s pie. They rejected God’s covenant for the instant gratification of a cut of their mate’s giro. And sinners were called sinners because they were…well, you know, sinners. They broke the Lord’s commandments flagrantly and without shame. Often in their very line of work. And yet it was to these people that Jesus gave his time. To Matthew and his mates that he became a mate (Matt. 9.9-11). Them that he came to rescue (Matt. 9.12-13).

Matthew’s house: surprisingly similar to Spoons in Cleck…

As I said last time, I’ve been thinking carefully recently about what it means in our context to follow a Saviour who came for tax collectors and sinners. A Saviour who was a friend to those society rejected. And I’ve come to a shocking conclusion. I reckon it means I too should be a friend to tax collectors and sinners. To invest in them, love them, show them Jesus. Nuts, eh?!

And here’s the thing: I don’t primarily mean my mate who spends his working week in the HMRC offices. Because in our context it means I’m going to have friends who don’t fit into our societies’ nice little boxes.

You see, I am a friend of racists. Proper, open racists. People who won’t buy stuff because Asian people are selling it. They might look over their shoulder before they say it. But they’ll say it all the same.

And I’m a friend of junkies. Of alcoholics. Of people who shout, and swear, and smoke, and fight. Of people who are…well, you know, sinners.

That’s not because I’m special. I’m not some hardcore Christian, specially gifted to reach those who a large, and vocal, part of our society rejects. My friends are just normal people. They’re sinners. Like you, and like me. It’s just their sins are not always the respectable ones that our society accepts.

And I love them. Some of the things they say I disagree with! Some of them we have debates about. But it’s not summat I go on about a lot. They’re my mates. I like them. And, ultimately, it’s not their biggest problem. They need Jesus, and his gospel. And so I don’t want to hold them at arm’s length until they clean up their views on ethnicity, or their bloodstream, or (perhaps most shockingly to some) their language. I want to invest in my friends and tell them of the glorious good news of a Saviour who died that racists, junkies, and nutjobs might be holy and blameless children of their heavenly Father.

You see, Paul tells us that, ‘God demonstrates his own love for us in this: while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.’ (Rom. 5.8) Not after we’d cleaned ourselves up, and gone all respectable. And that means that I’m as needy as they are. The only difference is that, unlike those religious leaders in Matthew 9, because of God’s grace I know I’m sick. In ways that you will never know. And I don’t even want to know what goes on in your head! But Jesus came not to call the righteous (that’d be a one sided conversation!), but sinners. The gospel is for sinners. And unless we’re prepared to stick our messy, sinful hearts into the messy, sinful lives of those around us, they’re not going to hear it.

You’re context might be different. Maybe it’s the multi-millionaire tax dodgers and the crooked bosses who are the tax collectors (literally) and sinners in your community. We don’t tend to get too many of them in Cleck. But whatever our context, the bare facts are these: Jesus died for sinners. Jesus came for sinners. Not for the righteous. If you say you follow him and yet your only friends are the righteous (or those who think they are), then there might be a good chance that you’re doing it ‘wrong’.

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